14 Formation Day Early Warning for Disasters


Early warning is a major element of disaster risk reduction and can minimise the loss of lives and economic impacts. Timely early warning is key to a structured and efficient response.

To be effective, early warning systems need to involve the communities at risk, generate public awareness, effectively disseminate warnings and ensure there is a constant state of preparedness. Over the years, India has made considerable progress in issuing accurate and timely early warning, especially for cyclones. Very recently, authorities could evacuate thousands before Cyclone Gaja made its landfall as its path was accurately predicted by the India Meteorological Department (IMD).

Despite the progress, a lot needs to be done to further improve our early warning mechanisms, hence the theme chosen for National Disaster Management Authority's 14 Formation Day was 'Early Warning for Disasters'. The Formation Day was celebrated on November 27, 2018 in New Delhi.  

Inaugurating the event, Union Minister of State for Home Affairs, Shri Kiren Rijiju, said, that half the battle against the disasters would be won by increasing disaster awareness and improving early warning systems. He said that the Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi is taking special interest in making the country more disaster resilient.    

In the backdrop of some recent incidents where fishermen were caught unawares despite early warning, issues specific to dissemination of warnings to fishermen at deep sea was discussed in great detail. The functioning of various technological tools such as the NAVIC satellite constellation, which generates alerts for the fishermen in their regional language, was discussed.

Issues in early warning for lightning and thunderstorm, State and district level early warning action plans, the role and participation of communities and media in early warning dissemination were also discussed.

NDMA is working towards creating a uniform, credible and integrated national-level database with locally obtained and validated data. This is a must for making suitable policy interventions to strengthen disaster resilience. NDMA made a presentation on the subject on the occasion to strengthen consensus on the same.

Inaugurating the event, Union Minister of State for Home Affairs, Shri Kiren Rijiju, said, that half the battle against the disasters would be won by increasing disaster awareness and improving early warning systems. He said that the Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi is taking special interest in making the country more disaster resilient. 
     
Despite the progress, a lot needs to be done to further improve our early warning mechanisms, hence the theme chosen for NDMA's 14 Formation Day was 'Early Warning for Disasters'. The Formation Day was celebrated on November 27, 2018 in New Delhi. 
      
In the backdrop of some recent incidents where fishermen were caught unawares despite early warning, issues specific to dissemination of warnings to fishermen at deep sea was discussed in great detail. The functioning of various technological tools such as the NAVIC satellite constellation, which generates alerts for the fishermen in their regional language, was discussed.


To be effective, early warning systems need to involve the communities at risk, generate public awareness, effectively disseminate warnings and ensure there is a constant state of preparedness. Over the years, India has made considerable progress in issuing accurate and timely early warning, especially for cyclones. Very recently, authorities could evacuate thousands before Cyclone Gaja made its landfall as its path was accurately predicted by the India Meteorological Department (IMD).

Issues in early warning for lightning and thunderstorm, State and district level early warning action plans, the role and participation of communities and media in early warning dissemination were also discussed.

NDMA is working towards creating a uniform, credible and integrated national-level database with locally obtained and validated data. This is a must for making suitable policy interventions to strengthen disaster resilience. NDMA made a presentation on the subject on the occasion to strengthen consensus on the same.

Stakeholders also discussed the roadmap, their roles and key challenges in issuing timely and accurate early warning and its dissemination to all relevant stakeholders, including the vulnerable communities.

Emphasising upon the need to ensure last-mile connectivity, Dr. P. K. Mishra, Additional Principal Secretary to the Prime Minister, said, "Any warning, howsoever early, cannot be effective unless there is a robust end-to-end dissemination system."

On the occasion, a manual for training masons on Hazard-resistant Construction and a study report on Gujarat Floods of 2017 was also released. The training manual will enable masons to construct resilient and sustainable houses, which will help reduce the loss of lives and property due to a disaster. The study report documents the best practices and lessons learnt by Gujarat during last year's floods. This study also makes recommendations for strengthening institutional arrangements towards further improving the State's resilience.

NDMA Members and officials, senior officials from the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA),  National Disaster Response Force (NDRF), National Institute of Disaster Management (NIDM), Ministries/Departments of the Central Government, State Governments, civil society, and ex-Members and Advisory Committee members of NDMA participated in the event.

Discussions at the event would go a long way in increasing awareness and aid improvement of our early warning mechanisms for disasters.

Technical Sessions
ü  Disasters and Early Warning: Scenario, Challenges and Way Forward
ü  Early Warning: Lightning and Thunderstorm
ü  Cross-Cutting Issues in Early Warning
ü  Disaster Database Management


1.Comments will be moderated by NDMA'seditorial team. 2.Comments that are abusive, personal, incendiary or irrelevant cannot be published. 3.Please write complete sentences. Do not type comments in all capital letters, or in all lower case letters, or using abbreviated text. (example: u cannot substitute for you, d is not 'the', n is not 'and'). 4.We may remove hyperlinks within comments. 5.Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name, to avoid rejection.

Comments